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The University of Texas
Marine Science Institute
750 Channel View Drive
Port Aransas, TX 78373

Phone: 361-749-6711
Fax: 361-749-6777

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DUNTON, KENNETH H

Kenneth H Dunton

Professor
Department of Marine Science


Aquatic Plant Ecology, Coastal Ecosystem Processes

ken.dunton@utexas.edu

Phone: 361-749-6744

Office Location
MSP 208

Postal Address
The University of Texas at Austin
Mar Sci Inst-Port Aran
750 Channel View Dr
Port Aransas, TX 78373

Ph.D., University of Alaska (1985)
M.S., Western Washington University (1977)
B.S., University of Maine-Orono (1975)

Research Interests

Aquatic Plant Ecology/Coastal Ecosystem Processes

Benthic marine vegetation of subtropical and polar regions, including the biology of high latitude kelps and the ecology of subtropical seagrass and estuarine marsh communities; structure and function of estuarine and coastal food webs; biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen in aquatic plant communities; application of stable isotopes as tracers of anthropogenic-N in coastal systems; ecosystem response to climate change.

Funded projects include:

In the Arctic, (1) an NSF funded study that examines the linkages between watersheds in the eastern Alaskan Beaufort Sea to specifically answer the question: are terrestrial subsides of carbon from run-off and erosion incorporated into arctic estuarine food webs (see press release Texas Science, Caller Times and South Jetty) (2) a newly funded 5 yr. renewal (see press release) to a 4 year research project that describes the benthic community structure and trophic energetics of the Chukchi Sea ecosystem (see: COMIDA CAB) (3) ecological charecterization of the linked barrier island - lagoon ecosystem of the eastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Natural Wildlife Refuge; ANWR); and (4) the effect of offshore oil exploration and development activities on benthic marine algae and coastal food webs.

In the Gulf of Mexico, the incorporation of nitrogen from coastal watersheds into the food webs of seagrass and coral reef communities. In Texas, (1) the development of models to predict seagrass productivity and plant carbon balance as a function of the in situ light environment, (2) experimental evaluation of water quality indicators to assess seagrass ecological status, and (3) the effect of freshwater inflows on the production ecology of a subtropical estuarine marsh based on measurements of insitu photosynthesis and respiration of emergent vascular plants. Work on the role of marine macrophytes in aquatic food webs using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes also continues, and is currently focused on coral reef and estuarine systems in the Gulf of Mexico.

Selected Publications (a complete list of publications is located under "Publications" tab)

Dunton, K.H., S.V. Schonberg, and L.W. Cooper. 2012. The ecology of coastal waters and estuarine lagoons of  the eastern Alaskan Beaufort Sea. Estuaries and Coasts 35: 416-435.

Dunton, K.H., S.V. Schonberg, and D.W. Funk.  2009.  Interannual and spatial variability in light attenuation:  evidence from three decades of growth in the arctic kelp, Laminaria solidungula.  In: Smithsonian at the Poles: Contributions to International Polar Year Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C., 3-4 May, 2007.  Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institute Scholarly Press.

Dunton, K.H., T. Weingartner and E.C. Carmack.  2006.  The nearshore western Beaufort Sea ecosystem: circulation and importance of terrestrial carbon in arctic coastal food webs.  Progress in Oceanography 71: 362-378.

Dunton, K.H.  2001.  δ15N and δ13C measurement of Antarctic peninsula fauna: trophic relationships and assimilation of benthic seaweeds.  American Zoologist 41:99-112.

Dunton, K.H., B. Hardegree, and T.E. Whitledge.  2001.  Response of estuarine marsh vegetation to inter-annual variations in precipitation.  Estuaries 24(6A):851-861.

Lee, K.-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Inorganic nitrogen acquisition in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass): development of whole-plant nitrogen budget.  Limnology and Oceanography 44(5): 1204-1215.

 

 

Publications (Ken Dunton)

PUBLICATIONS IN PEER-REVIEWED SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS

Wilce, R.T and K.H. Dunton. 2014. The Boulder Patch (North Alaska, Beaufort Sea) and its benthic algal flora. Artic 67 (1): 43-56.

Dunton, K.H., J.M. Grebmeier, and J. H. Trefry. 2014. The benthic ecosystem of the northeastern Chukchi Sea: an overview of its unique biogeochemistry and biological characteristics. Deep-Sea Research II 102: 1-8.      

Schonberg, S.V., J.T. Clarke and K.H. Dunton. 2014.  Distribution, abundance, biomass and diversity of benthic infauna in the northeast Chukchi Sea, Alaska: relation to environmental variables and marine mammals. Deep-Sea Research II 102: 144-163.

McTigue, N.D. and K.H. Dunton. 2014. Trophodynamics and organic matter assimilation pathways in the northeast Chukchi Sea, Alaska. Deep-Sea Research II 102: 84-96.

Trefry, J.H., R.P. Trocine, L.W. Cooper, and K.H. Dunton. 2014. Trace metals and organic carbon in sediments of the northeastern Chukchi Sea. Deep-Sea Research II 102: 18-31.

Souza, A.C., W.S. Gardner, and K.H. Dunton. 2014. Rates of nitrification and ammonium dynamics in northeastern Chukchi Sea shelf waters. Deep-Sea Research II 102: 68-76.

Souza, A.C., I.-N. Kim, W.S. Gardner, and K.H. Dunton. 2014. Dinitrogen, oxygen, and nutrient fluxes at the sediment-water interface and bottom water physical mixing on the eastern Chukchi Sea shelf. Deep-Sea Research II 102: 77-83.

Stachelek, J. and K.H. Dunton. 2013. Freshwater inflow requirement for the Nueces Delta, Texas: Spartina alterniflora as an indicator of ecosystem condition. Texas Water Journal 4(2): 62-73.

Wilson, C.J., P.S. Wilson, and K.H. Dunton. 2013. Seagrasses provide an acoustic refuge for estuarine fish. Marine Ecology Progress Series 472: 117-127.

Rasser, M.K., N.W. Fowler, and K.H. Dunton. 2013. Elevation and plant community distribution in a microtidal salt marsh of the Western Gulf of Mexico. Wetlands 33(4): 575-583.

Trefry, J.H., K.H. Dunton, R.P. Trocine, S.V. Schonberg, N.D. McTigue, E.S. Hersh, and T.J. McDonald. 2013. Chemical and biological assessment of two offshore drilling sites in the Alaskan Arctic. Marine Environmental Research 86: 35-45.

Wilson, C.J., P.S. Wilson, and K.H. Dunton. 2012. Assesing the low frequency acoustic characteristics of Macrocystis pyrifera, Egregia menziessi, and Laminaria solidungula". Journal of the Acoustical Society of America: 133 (6). DOI: 10.1121/1.4802637

Wilson, C.J., P.S. Wilson, and K.H. Dunton. 2012. An acoustic investigation of seagrass photosynthesis. Marine Biology 159: 2311-2322.

McClelland, J.W., R.M. Holmes, K.H. Dunton, and R.W. Macdonald. 2012. The Arctic Ocean Estuary. Estuaries and Coasts 35:353-368.

Dunton, K.H., S.V. Schonberg, and L.W. Cooper. 2012. The ecology of coastal waters and estuarine lagoons of the eastern Alaskan Beaufort Sea. Estuaries and Coasts 35: 416-435.

Wilson, J.W., P.S. Wilson, C.A. Greene, and K.H. Dunton. 2010. Seagrass leaves in 3-D: using computed tomography and low-frequency acoustics to investigate the material properties of seagrass tissue.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 395:128-134.

Iken, K., B. Bluhm, and K. Dunton.  2009.  Benthic food-web structure under differing water mass properties in the southern Chukchi Sea.  Deep-Sea Research II 57:71-85.

Gómez, I., A. Wulff, M.Y. Roleda, P. Huovinen, U. Karsten, L. Quartino, K.H. Dunton, and C. Wiencke.  2009.  Light and temperature demands of marine benthic microalgae and seaweeds in polar regions.  Botanica Marina 52: 593-608.

Wiencke, C., I. Gómez, and K.H. Dunton.  2009.  Phenology and seasonal physiological performance of polar seaweeds.  Botanica Marina 52: 585-592.

Miller, H., P. Neale, K. Dunton.  2009.  Biological weighting functions for UV inhibition of photosynthesis in the kelp Laminaria hyperborea (Phaeophyceae).  Journal of Phycology 45: 571-584.

Wilson, P.S. and K.H. Dunton.  2009.  Laboratory investigation of the acoustic response of seagrass tissue in the frequency band 0.5-2.5 kHz.  Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 125(4): 1951-1959.

Forbes, M.G., H.D. Alexander, and K.H. Dunton.  2008.  Effects of pulsed riverine versus non-pulsed wastewater inputs of freshwater on plant community structure in a semi-arid salt marsh.  Wetlands 28(4): 984-994.

Martin, R.S., C.P. Onuf and K.H. Dunton.  2008.  Assessment of propeller and off-road vehicle scarring in seagrass beds and wind-tidal flats of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.  Botanica Marina 51:79-91.

Wilson, P.S. and K.H. Dunton.  2007.  Seagrass acoustics: results of an experimental laboratory investigation.  Proceedings of the Institute of Acoustics p. 383-390.

Aumack, C.F., K.H. Dunton, A.B. Burd, D.W. Funk, and R.A. Maffione.  2007.  Linking light attenuation and suspended sediment loading to benthic productivity within an arctic kelp bed community.  Journal of Phycology 43:853-863.

Mutchler, T., K.H. Dunton, A. Townsend-Small, S Fredriksen, and M. Rasser.  2007.  Isotopic and elemental indicators of nutrient sources and status of coastal habitats in the Caribbean Sea, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.  Estuarine and Coastal Shelf Science 74:449-457.

Miller, H.L. and K.H. Dunton.  2007.  Stable isotope (13C) and O2 micro-optode alternatives for measuring photosynthesis in seaweeds.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 329:85-97.

Dunton, K.H., T. Weingartner and E.C. Carmack.  2006.  The nearshore western Beaufort Sea ecosystem: circulation and importance of terrestrial carbon in arctic coastal food webs.  Progress in Oceanography 71:362-378.

Forbes, M.G. and K.H. Dunton.  2006.  Response of a subtropical estuarine marsh to local climatic change in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.  Estuaries and Coasts 29:1242-1254.

Kopecky, A.L. and K.H. Dunton.  2006.  Variability in drift macroalgal abundance in relation to biotic and abiotic factors in two seagrass dominated estuaries in the western Gulf of Mexico.  Estuaries and Coasts 29:617-629.

Wiencke, C., M.N. Clayton, I. Gómez, K. Iken, U.H. Lüder, C.D. Amsler, U. Karsten, D. Hanelt, K. Bischof, and K. Dunton.  2006.  Life strategy, ecophysiology and ecology of seaweeds in polar waters.  Review of Environmental Science and Biotechnology DOI 10.1007/s11157-006-0001-4.

Alexander, H.D. and K.H. Dunton.  2006.  Treated wastewater as an alternative freshwater source in a hypersaline salt marsh: impacts on salinity, inorganic nitrogen, and emergent vegetation.  Journal of Coastal Research 22:377-392.

Lamote, M. and K.H. Dunton.  2006.  Effects of drift macroalgae and light attenuation on chlorophyll fluorescence and sediment sulfides in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum.  J. Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 334:174-186.

Jacob, U., T. Brey, I. Fetzer, S. Kaehler, K. Mintenbeck, K. Dunton, K. Beyer, U. Struck, E.A. Pakhomov, and W.E. Arntz.  2006.  Towards the trophic structure of the Bouvet Island marine ecosystem.  Polar Biology 29:106-113.

Dunton, K.H., J.L. Goodall, S.V. Schonberg, J.M. Grebmeier, and D.R. Maidment.  2005.  Multi-decadal synthesis of benthic-pelagic coupling in the western arctic: role of cross-shelf advective processes.  Deep-Sea Research II 52:3462-3477.

Kaldy, J.E., K.H. Dunton, J.L. Kowalski, and K.-S. Lee.  2004.  Factors controlling seagrass revegetation onto dredged material deposits: a case study in lower Laguna Madre, Texas.  Journal of Coastal Research 20(1):292-300.

Alexander, H.D. and K.H. Dunton.  2002.  Freshwater inundation effects on emergent vegetation of a hypersaline salt marsh.  Estuaries 25(6B):1426-1435.

Raven, J.A., A.M. Johnston, J.E. Kubler, R. Korb, S.G. McInroy, L.L. Handley, C.M. Scrimgeour, D.I. Walker, J Beardall, M.N. Clayton, M. Vanderklift, S. Fredriksen, and K.H. Dunton.  2002.  Seaweeds in cold seas: evolution and carbon acquisition.  Annals of Botany 90:525-536.

Raven, J.A., A.M. Johnston, J.E. Kubler, R. Korb, S.G. McInroy, L.L. Handley, C.M. Scrimgeour, D.I. Walker, J Beardall, M. Vanderklift, S. Fredriksen, and K.H. Dunton. 2002.  Mechanistic interpretation of carbon isotope discrimination by marine macroalgae and seagrasses.  Functional Plant Biology 29:355-378.

Major, K.M. and K.H. Dunton.  2002.  Variations in light-harvesting characteristics of the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum: evidence for photoacclimation.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 275:173-189.

Dunton, K.H. and S.V. Schonberg.  2002.  Assessment of propeller scarring in seagrass beds of the south Texas coast.  Journal of Coastal Research 37:100-110.

Dunton, K.H., B. Hardegree, and T.E. Whitledge.  2001.  Response of estuarine marsh vegetation to interannual variations in precipitation.  Estuaries 24(6A):851-861.

Dunton, K.H.  2001.  δ15N and δ13C measurements of Antarctic peninsular fauna: trophic relationships and assimilation of benthic seaweeds.  American Zoologist 41(1):99-112.

Burd, A.B. and K.H. Dunton.  2001.  Field verification of a light-driven model of biomass changes in the seagrass Halodule wrightii.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 209:85-98.

Lee, K.-S. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 255:201-214.

Major, K.M. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Photosynthetic performance in Syringodium filiforme: seasonal variation in light-harvesting characteristics.  Aquatic Botany 68:249-264.

Dunton, K.H. and S.V. Schonberg.  2000.  The benthic faunal assemblage of the Boulder Patch kelp community.  In: The Natural History of an Arctic Oil Field.  J.C. Truett and S.R. Johnson (eds.), p.371-397.  New York: Academic Press.

Lee, K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Effects of nitrogen enrichment on biomass allocation, growth, and leaf morphology of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 196:39-48.

Kaldy, J.E. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Above- and below-ground production, biomass and reproductive ecology of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) in a subtropical coastal lagoon.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 193:271-283.

Whitledge, T.E., D.A. Stockwell, E.J. Buskey, K.H. Dunton, G.J. Holt, S.A. Holt, and P.A. Montagna.  1999.  Persistent brown tide bloom in Laguna Madre, Texas.  In: The Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem.  H. Kumpf, K. Steidinger, K. Sherman (eds.), p. 338-359.  London: Blackwell Science.

Buskey, E.J., K.H. Dunton, and P.L. Parker.  1999.  Variations in stable carbon isotope ratio of the copepod Acartia tonsa during the onset of the Texas brown tide.  Estuaries 22(4):995-1003.

Kaldy, J.E., N. Fowler and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Critical assessment of Thalassia testudinum (Turtle grass) aging techniques: implications for demographic inferences.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 181:279-288.

Kaldy, J.E. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Ontogenetic photosynthetic changes, dispersal and survival of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) seedlings in a sub-tropical lagoon.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 240:193-212.

Lee, K.-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Inorganic nitrogen acquisition in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum: development of whole-plant nitrogen budget.  Limnology and Oceanography 44(5):1204-1215.

Lee, K.-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Influence of sediment nitrogen -availability on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum.  Marine Biology 134:217-226.

Herzka, S.Z. and K.H. Dunton.  1998.  Light and carbon balance in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum: evaluation of current production models.  Marine Biology 132:711-721.

Cooper, L.W., T.M. Beasley, X.-L. Zhao, C. Soto, K.L. Vinogradova, and K.H. Dunton.  1998. Marine algae as historical indicators of the transport of nuclear fuel re-processing wastes from mid-to-high latitudes in the Atlantic Ocean.  Marine Biology 131:391-399.

Herzka, S.Z. and K.H. Dunton.  1997.  Seasonal photosynthetic patterns in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum in the western Gulf of Mexico.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 152:103-117.

Henley, W.J. and K.H. Dunton.  1997.  Effects of nitrogen supply and continuous darkness on growth and photosynthesis of the arctic kelp, Laminaria solidungula.  Limnology and Oceanography 42(2):209-216.

Lee, K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1997.  Effects of in situ light reduction on the maintenance, growth and partitioning of carbon resources in Thalassia testudinum Banks ex König.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 210:53-73.

Lee, K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1996.  Production and carbon reserve dynamics of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 143:201-210.

Dunton, K.H.  1996.  Photosynthetic production and biomass of the subtropical seagrass Halodule wrightii along an estuarine gradient.  Estuaries 19:436-447.

Czerny, A.B. and K.H. Dunton.  1995.  The effects of in situ light reduction on the growth of two subtropical seagrasses, Thalassia testudinum and Halodule wrightii.  Estuaries 18:418-427.

Dunton, K.H. and P.K. Dayton.  1995.  The biology of high latitude kelp.  In: Ecology of Fjords and Coastal Waters.  H.R. Skjoldal et al. (eds.), p. 499-507.  Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Henley, W.J. and K.H. Dunton.  1995.  A seasonal comparison of carbon, nitrogen and pigment content in Laminaria solidungula and L. saccharina (Phaeophyta) in the Alaskan Arctic.  J. Phycology 31:325-331.

Kaldy, J.E., K.H. Dunton, and A.B. Czerny.  1995.  Variation in macroalgal species composition and abundance on a rock jetty in the northwest Gulf of Mexico.  Botanica Marina 38:519-527.

Tomasko, D.A. and K.H. Dunton.  1995.  Primary productivity in Halodule wrightii: a comparison of techniques based on daily carbon budgets.  Estuaries 18:271-278.

Dunton, K.H.  1994.  Seasonal growth and biomass of the subtropical seagrass Halodule wrightii in relation to continuous measurements of underwater irradiance.  Marine Biology 120:479-489.

Dunton, K.H. and D.A. Tomasko.  1994.  In situ photosynthesis in the seagrass Halodule wrightii in a hypersaline tropical lagoon.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 107:281-293.

Golikov, A.N., S.Y. Gagaev, V.V. Galtzova, and K.H. Dunton.  1994.  The ecosystems, flora and fauna of the Chaun Bay of the East-Siberian Sea.  In: Exploration of the Fauna of the Seas.  O.A. Scarlotto (ed.), vol. 57(55):4-111.  St. Petersburg: Russian Academy of Sciences.

Dunton, K.H.  1992.  Arctic biogeography: the paradox of the marine benthic fauna and flora.  Trends Ecol. and Evol. 7(6):183-189. (INVITED)

Dunton, K.H., S.V. Schonberg, L.R. Martin, and G.S. Mueller.  1992.  Seasonal and annual variations in the underwater light environment of an arctic kelp community.  In: Diving for Science.  L.B. Cahoon (ed.), p. 83-92.  Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Scientific Diving Symposium.  Costa Mesa, CA: Amer. Acad. Underwater Sci.

Sellman, P.V., A.J. Delaney, E.J. Chamberlain, and K.H. Dunton.  1992.  Seafloor temperature and conductivity data from Stefansson Sound, Alaska.  Cold Reg. Sci. Tech. 20:271-288.

Dunton, K.H.  1990.  Growth and production in Laminaria solidungula: relation to continuous underwater light levels in the Alaskan High Arctic.  Marine Biology 106:297-304.

Dunton, K.H.  1990.  Production ecology of Ruppia maritima L. s. l. and Halodule wrightii Aschers. in two subtropical estuaries.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 143:147-164.

Dunton, K.H., L.R. Martin, and R.H. Day.  1990.  Effects of diesel fuel arctic on photosynthesis and pigment levels in antarctic marine algae following the Bahia Paraiso fuel spill.  Antarctic Journal of the U.S. 25(5):177-179.

Kennicutt, M.C., et al., (K.H. Dunton).  1990.  Oil spillage in Antarctica.  Environ. Sci. Technol. 24(5):620-624.

Dunton, K.H., S.M. Saupe, A.N. Golikov, D.M. Schell, and S.V. Schonberg.  1989.  Trophic relationships and isotopic gradients among arctic and subarctic marine fauna.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 56:89-97.

Dunton, K.H. and C. Jodwalis.  1988.  Photosynthetic performance of Laminaria solidungula measured in situ in the Alaskan High Arctic.  Marine Biology 98:277-285.

Dunton, K.H. and D.M. Schell.  1987.  Dependence of consumers on macroalgal (Laminaria solidungula) carbon in an arctic kelp community: 13C evidence.  Marine Biology 93:615-625.

Dunton, K.H. and D.M. Schell.  1986.  Seasonal carbon budget and growth of Laminaria solidungula in the Alaskan High Arctic.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 31:57-66.

Dunton, K.H.  1985.  Growth of dark-exposed Laminaria saccharina (L.) Lamour. and Laminara solidungula J. Ag. (Laminariales: Phaeophyta) in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 94:181-189.

Dunton, K.H.  1984.  An annual carbon budget for an arctic kelp community.  In: The Alaska Beaufort Sea: Ecosystems and Environments.  P. Barnes, D. Schell, and E. Reimnitz (eds.), p. 311-326.  Orlando: Academic Press.

Dunton, K.H., E. Reimnitz, and S.V. Schonberg.  1982.  An arctic kelp community in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.  Arctic 35(4):465-484. BOOKS AND BOOK CHAPTERS (peer-reviewed)

Wiencke C, I. Gomez, and K. Dunton. 2011. Phenology and seasonal physiological performance of polar seaweeds. In: Biology of Polar Benthic Algae, C. Wiencke (ed.), pp. 181-194 (Ch 9), Walter de Gruyter GmBh & Co. Berlin/New York.

Gomez I, A. Wulff, M. Y. Roleda, P. Huovinen, U. Karsten, M.L. Quartino, K. Dunton, C. Wiencke. 2011. Light and temperature demands of benthic microalgae and seaweeds in polar regions.  In: Biology of Polar Benthic Algae, C. Wiencke (ed.), pp. 195-220 (Ch 10), Walter de Gruyter GmBh & Co. Berlin/New York.

Dunton, K.H., S.V. Schonberg, and D.W. Funk.  2009.  Interannual and spatial variability in light attenuation: evidence from three decades of growth in the arctic kelp, Laminaria solidungula.  In: Smithsonian at the Poles: Contributions to International Polar Science. Krupnick et al. (eds.), pp. 271-284, Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, Washington, D.C.

Mutchler, T., R.F. Mooney, S. Wallace, L. Podsim, S. Fredriksen, and K.H. Dunton. 2010.  Origins and fate of inorganic-nitrogen from land to coastal ocean on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.  In: Coastal Lagoons: Critical Habitats of Environmental Change. Kennish, M.J. and H.W. Paerl (eds.), pp. 283-305, CRC Press, Boca Raton.

Mateo, M.A., J. Cebrián, K. Dunton, and T. Mutchler.  2006.  Carbon Flux in Seagrass Ecosystems.  In: Seagrasses: Biology, Ecology and Conservation.  Larkum, A.W.D., et al (eds.), pp. 159-192, Springer, Berlin.

Dunton, K.H. and L. Cooper.  2005.  Feedbacks associated with sea-level rise along Arctic coasts.  In: Coastal Fluxes in the Anthropocene.  Crossland, et al (eds.), pp. 52-53.  Springer, Berlin.

AWARDS AND HONORS

2013 Director’s Excellence Award, USF&WS, Alaska Region 7.

2012 Outreach Award, College of Natural Sciences, UT-Austin

2011 Department of the Interior Appointee: Minerals Management Service, OCS Scientific Committee

2009 National Honor Society, Induction Ceremony Speaker, Port Aransas High School

2008 Department of the Interior Appointee: Minerals Management Service, OCS Scientific Committee

2007 Commencement Speaker, Port Aransas High School

2005 Teaching Excellence Award, College of Natural Sciences, UT-Austin

2003 Outreach Award, College of Natural Sciences, UT-Austin

2000 Teaching Excellence Award, College of Natural Sciences, UT-Austin

1999 Antarctica Service Medal of the United States of America, National Science Foundation

1996 Station Leader, Palmer Station, NSF (OPP), Antarctica

1996 Jerry McDonald Good Citizen Award, Port Aransas 1990 Antarctic Service Medal of the United States of America 1990 National Academy of Sciences, Exchange Scientist, Soviet Union

1985 National Academy of Sciences, Exchange Scientist, Soviet Union

PRINCIPLES OF ESTUARINE ECOLOGY - MNS f352 AND 152L (FIELD LAB)

A Department of Marine Science upper division undergraduate course. Summer session course offered in even numbered years. Detailed course information for registered students available on Blackboard.

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Dr. Ken Dunton (749-6744)

Dr. Chris Shank 

Textbooks:

Estuarine Ecology (2nd Edition).  John W. Day, Jr. et al.

Wiley-Blackwell. 2013

ISBN 978-0-471-75567-8

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Grading:

Attendance - 10%  Presentation - 25%  Reading Quizzes - 25%  Lecture Exam - 20%  Final Exercise - 20%    

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Some Objectives of the Course

◦To investigate the general ecological principles that govern the productivity and diversity of estuaries, including their physiography, hydrography, plant and animal community structure and chemistry.

◦To recognize the role of organisms in aquatic food webs, and in particular, to understand the ultimate fate and utilization of organic material as it is transported and transformed within estuarine systems.

◦To have a knowledge of the various measurements, tools, and techniques used by marine scientists to address questions and testable hypotheses relating to estuarine ecology.

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MARINE ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS - MNS 481C

Lecture Topics and Reading Assignments  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instructors:  Dr. Ed Buskey (x794) and  Dr. Ken Dunton (x744)

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Textbooks

Miller - Biological Oceanography

Mann and Lazier - Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems

Alongi - Coastal Ecosystem Processes

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Objectives of the Course

The purpose of this class is to provide a graduate level introduction to Biological Oceanography, Coastal Oceanography and Physical Oceanography for students planning on research in Biological and Chemical aspects of marine Science. The first half of the course will concentrate on open ocean processes (Buskey) and the second half will focus on coastal processes (Dunton). The class format will include lecture (3.0 hrs) and discussion sections (1 hr per week). Each student will be responsible for leading two discussion sections. For each, the student will compile a reference list of research articles on the topic and choose a paper for the class to read and discuss. The student will give a 15-20 minute introduction to the topic, and lead the discussion of the paper. 

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Grading

Your grade in this class will be based on your performance on two exams (a mid-term and a final exam), on two class presentations and several quizes.

Exams: Each exam will be a combination of objective and essay questions.  Essays will be graded on content, organization and clarity of communication.  The grades will be based on a numerical scale from 0 - 100.  This scale can be adjusted up on a curve with the mean class score representing a B, at our option.  If you must miss an examination due to unavoidable circumstances, you must notify the instructor at least 24 hours of the exam.  Exams must be made up as soon as possible.

Quizzes: Several short unannounced quizzes will be given during the course.  Material covered in previous classes and assigned reading are fair game.

Presentations/Discussions: Your grade will be based on the quality of the reading list you prepare, the quality of your short presentation and both your leading of discussions and participation in discussions lead by others.

Final Grade:

2 Examinations: 50%

2 Oral Presentations, Class Discussions: 20%

 Quizzes: 30%

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MARINE ECOLOGY - MNS 384J

A Department of Marine Science graduate course for students interested in any aspect of ecology. Taught simultaneously in Austin and Port Aransas via video link.  Registered students are advised to consult Blackboard for detailed and up-to-date course information.  

Instructors:  Dr. Ken Dunton (x744)

Textbooks

Bertness, M.D., S.D. Gaines, M.E. Hay.  2000.  Marine Community Ecology.  Sinauer Associates, Inc.

ISBN 0-87893-057-4

Monday and Wednesday 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM  (3 contact hours/week)

Video Conference Room ACES 3.336

Objectives of the Course

The purpose of this class is to provide graduate level inquiry- based instruction on the contemporary principles of marine ecology.  The course format consists of a weekly background lecture on a specific topic followed by a student led discussion based on readings from the primary literature on the selected topic.  Lectures are planned on Mondays with the respective discussion section on Wednesday of the same week.  The course uses a thematic approach and is divided into two major parts following the outline of the textbook.  The first half of the course concentrates on processes, and the second half on community types.

Student Class Presentations

Students will be asked to lead two discussion (lecture) sections. For each, the student is required to select one research paper for the class to read and discuss. The student will provide a one-page review that summarizes the significance of the paper in the context of existing knowledge on the selected topic. This review must be posted on the course Web page by the date and time of the corresponding Wednesday lecture. In class, the student will give a maximum 20-minute overview that integrates the most important aspects of the paper, and lead a critical and interactive discussion. Because of the balance between the number of students and number of Wednesday meetings, a majority of Wednesday sessions will include two joint presentations.  When two students are scheduled to present, they must work together to choose two interrelated papers for the discussion (e.g. opposing viewpoints on a single topic, alternative theories, comparison of analogous communities from geographically distant regions, etc.).  Each student will be expected to make at least one joint presentation.  Student presenters are expected to:

a) provide a comprehensive summary the main points of the papers;

b) state the significance or importance of the papers;

c) provide a critical assessment of the paper (does the data presented support the findings?), and;

d) elicit class participation.

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Grading

The final course grade will be based on two discussion topics, the reviews, quizzes, and class participation/attendance as follows:

Discussion Topics:     20% each

Written Reviews:       10% each

Class Participation/Attendance:   10%

Quizzes (6):     30%    

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MARINE BOTANY (MAYMESTER-MEXICO) MNS 352D

Instructor:  Dr. Kenneth Dunton (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) Phone: 361-471- 6744 (Marine Science, Port Aransas) Co-Instructors: Drs. Stein Fredriksen (Norway), Deana Erdner, Mike Gill, Philip Bucolo, and Luiz Rocha TA: Sara Wilson

This course is entirely focused on the ecology of Caribbean coral reef and seagrass communities of the Yucatan Peninsula with special emphasis on the marine vegetation. Our research and learning goal is to understand the effect of anthropogenic inputs of inorganic-nitrogen on tropical seagrasses, algal turfs, and the overall coral reef/coastal ecosystem. NOTE: No University of Texas at Austin student, faculty, or staff can be required to travel to a Restricted Region (http://world.utexas.edu/risk/restrictedregions). Any participation in travel to a Restricted Region is strictly voluntary, and the particpant assumes full responsibility for all risks associated with this travel.

Course Description: Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this course. Prerequisites: Upper division standing; Biology 311D; and of the following courses: Biology 322, 324,328, Marine Science 320, 352C; and three additional semester hours of coursework in biology. Field work includes a 19-day field trip to Akumal, Mexico from mid- May to early June. For additional information and detailed syllabus, contact Ken Dunton.




Susan Schonberg with her arctic benthic creatures on the R/V Alpha Helix in summer 2009.

Graduate Research Assistants and Research Topics

• Kelly Darnell, (Ph.D. Candidate) Seagrass Reproductive Ecology

• Nathan McTigue, (Ph.D. Candidate) Trophodynamics of Chukchi Sea Food Webs

• Jordann Young, (M.S. Candidate) Age Structure Demographics of Chukchi Sea Bivalves

• Sara Wilson,  (M.S. Candidate) Status and Trends of Texas Seagrasses

• Christina Bonsell, (Ph.D. Candidate) The Benthic Ecology of a High Arctic Kelp Community

• Carolynn Harris, (M.S. Candidate) Food Web Structure of the Nearshore Shelf of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea

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Research Associates

• Kimberly R. Jackson, Research Scientist Assistant

• Susan V. Schonberg, M.S., Research Associate

• Philip Bucolo, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow

• Tara Connelly, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow

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Undergraduate Student Research

 Victoria Congdon, UT Austin, Research for credit, 2012-2013

 Molly Mikan, University of Colorado - Denver, NSF-REU Intern, Summer 2009

 Kristin Golman, Trinity University, NSF-REU Intern, Summer 2008

 Alison James, Bord College, NSF-REU Intern, Summer 2008

 Brittany Haney, UT Austin, Research for credit, Spring 2008

 Travis Bartholomew, UT Austin, Research for credit, Spring and Summer 2008

 Michael Gil, UT Austin, Research for credit, Fall 2007 and Spring 2008

 Melissa Madison, UT Austin, Research for credit, Fall 2007

 Amanda Padilla, UT Austin, Research for credit, Summer 2004

 Adrienne Isaminger, UT Austin, Research for credit, Spring 2003 - Spring 2005

 Alegra Bartzat, UT Austin, Research for credit, Spring 2002

 Gabriel Vaughn, Southwestern University, Research for credit, Summer 2001

 Cara Leverett, UT Austin, Research for credit, Spring/Summer 1998

 Elissa Villines, Texas A&M Corpus Christi, Research for credit, Summer 1996 - Summer 2002

 Laura Saenz, Texas A&M Corpus Christi, NSF-REU Intern, Summer 1995

 Carina Chiscano, UT Austin, Research for credit, Summer 1995

 Sylvia Calderon, Western Washinton University, NSF-REU Intern, Summer 1994

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High School Science Internships

• Kelsey Cartwright, Port Aransas H.S., 2009-2010 (Project Title: Functionality of Naturally Created Wetlands)

• Sarah Armanovs, Port Aransas H.S., 2008 - 2009 (Project Title: A Comparison of Created Versus Natural Wetland Habitats)

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Previous Graduate Students

Karen Anne Bishop, M.S.; 2012, email: kbkalannie@gmail.com 

GK-12 Coordinator, Environmental Science Institute, UT-Austin.

Thesis: Freshwater Contributions and Nitrogen sources in a South Texas Estuarine Ecosystem: a Time-intergrated Story from Stable Isotope Ratios in the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

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Joseph Jeremy Stachelek, M.S.; 2012, email: jstachel@sfwmd.gov

Research Assistant, South Florida Water Management District

Thesis: Freshwater Inflows in the Nueces Delta, TX: Impacts on Porewater Salinity and Estimation of Needs

Publications:

Stachelek, J. and K.H. Dunton. 2013. Freshwater inflow requirement for the Nueces Delta, Texas: Spartina alterniflora as an indicator of ecosystem condition. Texas Water Journal 4(2): 62-73.

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Sarah Caitlin Wallace, M.S.; 2011, email: sarah0wallace@gmail.com

Research Assistant, University of Chicago

Thesis: Spatial and Temporal Variation in Trophic Structure of the Nueces Marsh, TX

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Christopher James Wilson, Ph.D.; 2011, email: cjw32485@gmail.com

Meterology/Oceanography Officer, United States Navy

Dissertation: The Acoustic Ecology of Submerged Macrophytes.

Publications:

Wilson, C.J., P.S. Wilson, and K.H. Dunton. 2013. Seagrasses provide an acoustic refuge for estuarine fish. Marine Ecology Progress Series 472:117-127.

Wilson, C.J., P.S. Wlson, and K.H. Dunton. 2013. Assesing the low frequency acoustic characteristics of Macrocystis pyrifera, Egregia menziessi, and Laminaria solidungula".Journal of the Acoustical Society of America:133 (6)/:3819-3826. DOI:10.1121/1.4802637

Wilson, C.J., P.S. Wilson, and K.H. Dunton. 2012. An acoustic inverstigation of seagrass photosynthesis. Marine Biology 159: 2311-2322.

Wilson, J.W., P.S. Wilson, C.A. Greene, and K.H. Dunton.2010. Seagrass leaves in 3-D: using computed tomography and low-frequency acoustics to investigate the material properties of seagrass tissue. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 395:128-134.  

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Michael Rasser, Ph.D.; 2009, email: mrasser@gmail.com

Marine Ecologist, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior

Dissertation: The role of Biotic and Abiotic Processes in the Zonation of Salt Marsh Plants in the Nueces River Delta, Texas.

Publications:

Rasser, M.K., N.W. Fowler, and K.H. Dunton, 2013. Elevation and plant community distribution in a microtidal salt marsh of the Western Gulf of Mexico. Wetlands 33(4): 575-583.

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Summer Martin (Langlois), M.S.; 2006, email: faithdaisy@yahoo.com

Coastal Resources Scientist, Coastal Protection and Resoration Authority (Louisiana)

Thesis: An assessment of Seagrass and Tidal Flat Recovery from Anthropogenic Physical Disturbance Events along the Padre Island National Seashore.

Publications:

Martin, R.S., C.P. Onuf and K.H. Dunton.  2008.  Assessment of propeller and off-road vehicle scarring in seagrass beds and wind-tidal flats of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.  Botanica Marina 51:79-91.

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Andrea Kopecky, M.S.; 2004, email: kopecky@hotmail.com

Staff Attorney, San Francisco Bay Keeper

Thesis:  Drift Macroalgal Abundance and Distribution in Relation to Biological Indicators in two Seagrass Dominated Texas Estuarine Systems.

Publications:

Kopecky, A.L. and K.H. Dunton.  2006.  Variability in drift macroalgal abundance in relation to biotic and abiotic factors in two seagrass dominated Texas estuaries.  Estuaries and Coasts, 29:617-629.

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Kelly Fellows, M.S.; 2004, email: kellyfellows@yahoo.com

Thesis:   Impacts of Human Disturbances on Seagrass Communities in the Padre Island National Seashore

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Craig Aumack, M.S.; 2003, email: phoronida@yahoo.com

Post-Doctoral Researcher, Columbia University

Thesis:  Linking Water Turbidity and TSS Loading to Kelp Productivity Within the Stefansson Sound Boulder Patch.

Publications:

Aumack, C.F., K.H. Dunton, A.B. Burd, D.W. Funk, and R.A. Maffione.  2007.  Linking light attenuation and suspended sediment loading to benthic productivity within an arctic kelp bed community.  J. Phycology. 43:853-863.

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Harlan L. Miller, Ph.D.; 2002, email: lanny.miller@mac.com

Director of Aguaculture, Algenol, Inc.

Dissertation:  Photosynthetic Response of Scandinavian Kelp Forest to Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

Publications:

Miller, H., P. Neale, K. Dunton. 2009. Biological weighting functions for UV inhibition of photosynthesis in the kelp Laminaria hyperborea (Phaeophyceae). Journal of Phycology 45: 571-584.

Miller, H.L. and K.H. Dunton.  (2007).  Stable isotope (13C) and O2 micro-optode alternatives for measuring photosynthesis in seaweeds.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 329:85-97.

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Megan Scanlin, M.S.; 2001, email: scanlin_megan@bah.com

Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Thesis: Del15N and del13C Measurements of Trophic structure on Coral Reef Systems Within the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

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Heather Alexander, M.S.; 2000, email: heather.alexander.utb.edu

Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Brownsville

Thesis:  Effects of soil Salinity, Inorganic Nitrogen and Fresh Water Inflow on the Vegetation of a hypersaline Salt Marsh.

Publications:

Alexander, H.D. and K.H. Dunton.  2006.  Treated wastewater effluent as an alternative freshwater source in a hypersaline salt marsh: impacts on salinity, inorganic nitrogen, and emergent vegetation.  Journal Coastal Research, 22:377-392.

Alexander, H.D. and K.H. Dunton.  2002.  Freshwater inundation effects on emergent vegetation of a hypersaliine salt marsh.  Estuaries 25(6b): 1426-1435.

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Christine Weilhoefer, M.A.; 1998, email: paved@hotmail.com

Associate Professor, North Central College

Thesis: Effects of Freshwater Inflow, Salinity and Nutrients on Salt Vegetation in South Texas.

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Kun-Seop Lee, Ph.D.; 1998 Professor, Pusan National Univeristy (Korea)

Dissertation: Nitrogen Budget for the Seagrass Thalassia testudinum in the Western Gulf of Mexico.

Publications:

Lee, K.-S. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 255:201-214.

Lee, K.-S. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Effects of nitrogen enrichment on biomass allocation, growth, and leaf morphology of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 196:39-48.

Lee K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Influence of sediment nitrogen availability on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum.  Marine Biology 134:217-226.

Lee, K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Inorganic nitrogen acquisition in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum: development of a whole-plant nitrogen budget.  Limnology and Oceanography 44(5):1204-1215.

Lee, K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1997.  Effects of in situ light reduction on the maintenance, growth and partitioning of carbon resources in Thalassia testudinum.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 210:53-73.

Lee, K-S. and K.H. Dunton.  1996.  Production and carbon reserve dynamics of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 143:201-210.   --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

James E. Kaldy, Ph.D., 1997: email: halophila@juno.com

Ecologist, US EPA Western Ecology Division

Dissertation: Production Dynamics, Reproduction Ecology and Demography of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) from the Lower Laguna Madre, Texas.

Publications:

Kaldy, J.E., K.H. Dunton, J.L. Kowalski, and K.-S. Lee.  2004.  Factors controlling seagrass revegetation onto dredged material deposits: a case study in Lower Laguna Madre, Texas.  Journal of Coastal Research 20(1):292-300.

Kaldy, J.E. and K.H. Dunton.  2000.  Above- and below- ground production, biomass and reproductive ecology of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) in a subtropical coastal lagoon.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 193:271-283.

Kaldy, J.E. and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Ontogenetic photosynthetic changes, dispersal and survival of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) seedlings.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 240:193-212.

Kaldy, J.E., N. Fowler, and K.H. Dunton.  1999.  Critical assessment of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) age determination: implications for demographic inferences.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 181:279-288

Kaldy, J.E., K.H. Dunton, and A.B. Czerny.  1995.  Variation in macroalgal species composition and abundance on a rock jetty in the northwest Gulf of Mexico.  Botanica Marina 38:519-527.   --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sharon Herzka, M.A.;1996

Research Professor, Department of Biological Oceanography, Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada

Thesis: Photosynthetic Performance of the Seagrass Thalassia testudinum in Corpus Christi Bay and Lower Laguna Madre, Texas.

Publications:

Herzka, S.Z. and K.H. Dunton.  1998.  Light and carbon balance in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum: evalutation of current production models.  Marine Biology 132: 711-721.

Herzka, S.Z. and K.H. Dunton.  1997.  Seasonal photosynthetic patterns in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum in the western Gulf of Mexico.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 152:103-117

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J. Michael Dibble, M.A.; 1995

Thesis:

Inorganic Nitrogen Uptake by Two Kelp Species, Laminaria solidungula and Laminaria saccharina, in the Alaskan High Arctic.

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Andrew Czerny, M.A.; 1994; email: andrew.czerny@nitelog.com

Thesis: Growth and Photosynthetic Responses of Two Subtropical Seagrasses, Thalassia testudinum and Halodule wrightii to in Situ Manipulations of Irradiance.

Publications:

Czerny, A.B. and K.H. Dunton.  1995.  The effects of in situ light reduction on the growth of two subtropical seagrasses, Thalassia testudinum and Halodule wrightii.  Estuaries 18:418-427.   --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Richard Day, M.A.; 1990; email: richard_day@nbs.gov

Wetland Ecologist, USGS National Wetlands Research Center

Thesis: Growth Rates of Three Species of Mangroves Bordering Laguna de Terminos, Campeche,Mexico.

Publications:

Dunton, K.H., L.R. Martin, and R.H. Day.  1990.  Effects of diesel fuel arctic on photosynthesis and pigment levels in antarctic marine algae following the Bahia Paraiso fuel spill. Antarctic Journal of the U.S. 25(5):177-179

Last updated: 15 October 2013

News for current and prospective graduate students:  

Thank you for expressing interest in the Department of Marine Science and in the research studies conducted from my laboratory.


In answer to some frequently asked questions, I am happy to provide the following information.  Please don’t hesitate to contact me directly by e-mail if you need additional clarification on our program.


New students: I normally accept one or two students for entry into my lab every Summer or Fall.  I currently have three Ph.D. students and three M.S. students.  To date, I have graduated 20 students (5 Ph.D. and 15 M.S.) who have worked  with me in the Gulf of Mexico, Norway, the Arctic and Antarctic.


Financial support:  I provide salary and tuition for graduate students under my supervision while they are enrolled as full time students and remain in good standing.  Students are paid as a Teaching Assistant (TA) while in Austin for their first semester or two.  Once they arrive in Port Aransas, they are appointed as a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA).  The current salary for students on either a TA or GRA will range from $1,839/month (Master’s candidate) to $1,999/month (Ph.D. candidate).  In both cases, the cost of tuition is also paid for the student. The appointment includes full medical insurance paid by the university ($462/month), which can be extended to spouse and family members (dental can be added for $30.08/monthly/person).  Salaries are only subject to Federal Income Taxes (Texas does not have an Income Tax). In addition, graduate fellowships are also available to students enrolled in the Department of Marine Science.  Ph.D. students are expected to work with me to initiate or develop additional funding for their research.


Housing and cost of living: With respect to cost of living expenses, Austin ranks below the national average, but private housing in Port Aransas can be very high since it is a resort community.  For this reason UTMSI provides housing for students (and their families, but NO pets) for a very reasonable cost (e.g. shared 2 bedroom cottage, $240/person; one bedroom apartment, $550 plus utilities; 3 bedroom apartment for family, $975 plus utilities).

Other:  I plan to offer an upper division study abroad course on the Carribbean coast of Mexico again in 2015 (see Mutchler et al., 2007; 2009 publications): See Marine Science Study Abroad Course in Mexico


New students would be encouraged to participate in the course if they are able to arrange their schedules and meet the logistical requirements.

Current research projects include:

1. Eastern Alaskan Beaufort Sea coast: Terrestrial Linkages to Microbial and Metazoan Communities in Coastal Ecosystems of the Beaufort Sea.  Summer and Winter field work is scheduled in the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve beginning Summer 2011.  Funding source:  National Science Foundation with logistical support from the Artic Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Co-PI's: Jim McClelland and Byron Crump. Press Release!

2. Beaufort Sea Ecosystem Study. This muliti-disciplinary project (2014-2018) incorporates biological, physical, and chemical components in the first integrated synthesis of the nearshore and mid-shelf of the Beaufort Sea Funding Source: Department of the Interior (BOEM).

3. Northeastern Chukchi Sea, Alaska: Hanna Shoal ecosystem study. A continuation of the 2009-2012 study, this multi-year (2011-2016) and interdisciplinery project is largely focused on the northern shelf of the Chukchi Sea in the Hanna Shoal. Research cruises in July/August 2012, 2013 and 2014. Funding source: Department of the Interior (BOEM) and Shell Alaska.

4. Beaufort Sea, Alaska:   Arctic kelp communities in the Beaufort Sea: Sentinels of long-term change.  A five year study with diving intensive field work scheduled from 2012-2017 in several locations along the central and eastern Alaska Beaufort Sea coast. Funding sources:  Department of the Interior (BOEM).

5. Nueces Estuarine Marsh System, Texas:  Ecological response of a subtropical estuarine marsh to fresh water inflow events.  This is a long term and continuous multi-decadal project that includes a substantial GIS component and the opportunity to conduct experimental field studies.  Funding sources: Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program.

6. Southwestern Gulf Coast, Texas: Landscape monitoring and biological indicators for seagrass conservation in Texas coastal waters. Our lab is directing the implementation of a state-wide seagrass monitoring program based on  analyses of water column and seagrass condition criteria specific to the major estuarine lagoon systems in Texas.  Funding sources: Mission-Aransas NERR, NPS (National Park Service), Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, Coastal Management program (through GLO and NOAA). see www.texasseagrass.org

7. Alaskan Beaufort Sea Shelf:  Characterization of food services in shorebird feeding areas of estuarine deltas of the Arctic Wildlife Refuge. Field studies in summers 2011, 2012 and 2013. Funding source: Department of the Interior (BOEM).