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Marine Science Institute
750 Channel View Drive
Port Aransas, TX 78373

Phone: 361-749-6711
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BLACK, BRYAN A

Bryan A Black

Assistant Professor
Department of Marine Science



bryan.black@utexas.edu

Phone: 361-749-6789

Office Location
MSI 318

Postal Address
The University of Texas at Austin
Mar Sci Inst-Port Aran
750 Channel View Dr
Port Aransas, TX 78373

Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University (2003)
M.S. Pennsylvania State University (1999)
B.S. Westminster College (1996)

Research Interests

Ecosystem Oceanography

Long-term relationships among productivity, growth, and climate; climate reconstruction; linkages among marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems; application of dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) to growth increments of fish, mollusk, and coral species; forest ecology and influence of terrestrial processes on the nearshore environment

Trees are living chronometers of the environment, faithfully recording histories of climate and forest disturbances in the properties of their annual rings. Worldwide, thousands of chronologies have been developed, extending unbroken for hundreds or even thousands of years. Beyond trees, a wide range of aquatic organisms including fish, bivalves, corals, and even some marine mammals form annual increments - and can be surprisingly long-lived. Members of several fish species have been aged at more than 100 years while at least one species of marine clam lives to be more than 500.

Originally trained as a forest ecologist, I apply techniques developed by dendrochronologists (tree-ring scientists) to generate growth-increment chronologies from the growth increments of marine and freshwater species. The need for such long-term data is especially pressing considering the oceans’ influence on global climate, the tremendous pressures of human use on marine ecosystems, and the scarcity of observational records.

Chronologies are used to:
-establish long-term patterns in growth and productivity well as their relationships to climate
-address long-term impacts of human use
-hind-cast climate prior to the start of instrumental records
-describe inter-relationships across diverse species and among marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems.

I also maintain work in terrestrial ecology, using dendrochronology as a tool for reconstructing histories of climate and forest disturbance. Other research interests include the use of original land surveys and archaeological records to describe the composition of forests prior to European settlement and the influences of Native American populations.

RESEARCH IN THE PRESS

KVAL News "Forest epidemic unprecedented, getting worse"
Science Daily "Forests at risk: Swiss needle cast epidemic in Douglas-fir trees unprecedented, still getting worse"
Science Magazine "Fungus slows fir"
Scientific American "Researchers pry climate change records from giant clams"
National Public Radio "Natural clues to Northwest climate history"
KEZI 9 News "OSU researchers look to marine life for climate clues"
Science Daily "Douglas-fir, geoducks make strange bedfellows in studying climate change"
Physorg.com "Study finds oldest trees grow slowest - even as youngsters"
Oregon Stater Magazine "Ocean researchers get it together"
Science Daily "Ocean health plays vital role in coral reef recovery"
Oregon Field Guide, Oregon Public Broadcasting. "Freshwater Mussels"
Salt Lake City Morning Desert News. "Mussels offer clues about Oregon streams"
Corvallis Gazette-Times. "Scientists are reading rockfish earbones"
The Oregonian. "Ancient trees win the tortoise versus hare race"

International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Annual Science Meeting Best presentation Award
Gdansk, Poland. September 2011

North Pacific Marine Science Organization Best Presentation in Biological Oceanography
Jeju, Korea. October 2009

RESEARCH OVERVIEW

Trees are living chronometers of the environment, faithfully recording histories of climate and forest disturbances in the properties of their annual rings. Worldwide, thousands of chronologies have been developed, extending unbroken for hundreds or even thousands of years. Beyond trees, a wide range of aquatic organisms including fish, bivalves, corals, and even some marine mammals form annual increments - and can be surprisingly long-lived. Members of several fish species have been aged at more than 100 years while at least one species of marine clam lives to be more than 500.

Originally trained as a forest ecologist, I apply techniques developed by dendrochronologists (tree-ring scientists) to generate growth-increment chronologies from the growth increments of marine and freshwater species. The need for such long-term data is especially pressing considering the oceans’ influence on global climate, the tremendous pressures of human use on marine ecosystems, and the scarcity of observational records.  These chronologies are used to:

-establish long-term patterns in growth and productivity well as their relationships to climate
-address long-term impacts of human use
-hind-cast climate prior to the start of instrumental records

Chronologies can also be used to describe linkages across diverse species and among marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems.  Remarkably, rockfish chronologies from the continental shelf of the US west coast relate to tree-ring chronologies from the Cascade Mountains due to shared sensitivities to climate.  This underscores the breadth of impacts that climate variability and change can have on biology at regional scales. Given their different "perspectives" of life history and habitat, combinations of marine, terrestrial, and freshwater chronologies can yield more robust climate histories than any one group could provide on its own.

I also maintain work in terrestrial ecology, using dendrochronology as a tool for reconstructing histories of climate and forest disturbance. Other research interests include the use of original land surveys and archaeological records to describe the composition of forests prior to European settlement and the influences of Native American populations.

BLACK research overview 3

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History and Future of Coastal Upwelling Modes and Biological Responses in the California Current

Collaborators: Bill Sydeman and Marisol Garcia-Reyes, Farallon Institute for Advanced Ecosystem Studies; Ryan Rykaczewski, University of South Carolina; Steven Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Funding: National Science Foundation and NOAA Fisheries and the Environment (FATE)

thin section of a splitnose rockfish otoliththin section of a splitnose rockfish otolith

A variety of biological time series including rockfish (Sebastes) otolith growth-increment chronologies, records of seabird reproductive success, ocean survival of salmon smolts, and sardine recruitment, are combined with climate data to demonstrate that upwelling, the primary driver of productivity, occurs in a distinct winter and a distinct summer pattern or "modes" that differentially affect the biology of the ecosystem.  We also investigate whether upwelling modes are forced by contrasting atmospheric-oceanographic processes that will be differentially impacted by global climate change, and with corresponding impacts on biology.  To better describe upwelling modes and their impacts on biology, we integrate winds and temperatures from local buoy data to better capture climate variability on much finer timescales than those in the upwelling indices used to date.  In addition, we will employ a suite of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) of varying structure and resolution to identify the large-scale atmospheric mechanisms that control the distinct seasonal upwelling modes.  Models will be run under various scenarios of climate change to examine future trends in upwelling modes, especially for winter.  Last, we will model past long-term variability in winter-mode upwelling using tree-ring data as a proxy.  These multicentennial reconstructions will provide context for interpreting observed increases in winter-mode variance over the last 50 years, as well as forecast changes under various climate-change scenarios.  We predict that winter-mode upwelling in the 20th century is within the historical range of variability, but may exceed those thresholds under various climate change scenarios.

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Impacts of climate on long-term growth patterns of yellowfin sole in the Bering Sea: empirical modeling and incorporation into stock assessment models

Collaborators: Beth Matta, Tom Helser, and Tom Wilderbuer, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle.

Funding: NOAA Fisheries and the Environment (FATE)

yellowfin sole otolithcross section of a yellowfin sole otolith, courtesy of Beth Matta

This project applies dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) techniques to develop an exactly dated chronology from otolith growth-increment widths in eastern Bering Sea yellowfin sole.  Goals are to 1) develop a continuous 40-year yellowfin sole biochronology, which would be a biological time series of unprecedented length for the system, 2) establish relationships between the chronology (anomalies in otolith growth) to population-level anomalies in yellowfin sole body size, 3) use the otolith chronology to hindcast anomalies in body size and investigate historical ranges of variability, and 4) evaluate the role of climate in any fluctuations in the otolith chronology and body size.  If body size varies over time, such a result would suggest that biological reference points for the population vary over time, with implications for stock assessment.

sole reconstruction small
The left panel (A) shows the relationship between anomaly in yellowfin sole body size (body mass index; bmi) and anomaly in otolith growth-increment width for fish in the eastern Bering Sea.  B) An otolith chronology can be used to hind-cast mean yellowfin sole body size (predicted) prior to observational records (observed) using the relationship in panel A.  This hind-cast shows considerable variability in yellowfin body size, implying that biological reference points central to stock assessments may change over time.

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High-resolution climate and recruitment reconstructions for Pacific geoduck

Collaborators: Claudia Hand, Shayne MacLellan, and Darlene Gillespie (Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Laboratory)

Funding: Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada

geoduck peel1
growth increments of a Pacific geoduck (acetate peel preparation)

Pacific geoduck is a particularly long-lived marine bivalve species common from Puget Sound to Kodiak that commonly attains ages of more than 120 years and support a multi-million dollar fishery in Washington, British Columbia, and Alaska. Geoduck growth-increment chronologies date to the 1880s, and can be extended even farther back in time using dead-collected shells from the ocean floor. These chronologies strongly relate to sea surface temperatures (SST), and are an excellent indicator (proxy) of SST prior to the start of instrumental records. These ocean tempertaure "reconstructions" are particulalrly robust if geoduck chronologies are combined with high-elevation tree-ring chronologies along the Pacific rim. Ocean temperatures affect precipitation, land temperatures, and snowpack and thus affect tree growth. The combination of indicators with their complementary perspectives of habitat and life history provide a much better history of climate than either indicator could provide on its own.

geoduck SST correl reducedCorrelations between a geoduck chronology and gridded sea surface temperature data for the North Pacific

geoduck recon

The Pacific Decadal Oscialltion (PDO), which is the dominant pattern of sea surface temperature in the North Pacific (red line). Prediction of the PDO from tree and geoduck chronologies (black line).

Crossdating hundreds of geoduck also reveals a highly episodic recruitment history, with favorable recruitment conditions occurring only once every several decades. Pilot work for this project was completed at the Hatfield Marine Science Center by the 2006 North American Dendroecology Fieldweek, and NSF funded Research Experience for Undergraduates interns Rose Kormanyos and Matthew Stuckey.

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Long-term climate-growth relationships for red snapper and gray snapper in the northern Gulf of Mexico

Collaborators: Robert Allman and Michael Schirripa, NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Funding: NOAA Fisheries and the Environment (FATE)

gray 02gs99-4 snap reducedthin section of a gray snapper otolith

Dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) techniques are applied to develop chronologies from the annual growth-increment widths of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) and gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus) otoliths sampled from the northern Gulf of Mexico, USA.  Growth increment widths show considerable synchrony within and across species, indicating that some component of environmental variability influenced growth.  The final, exactly dated red snapper chronology continuously spans 1975 through 2003 while the gray snapper chronology continuously spans 1975 through 2006.  To determine baseline climate-growth relationships, chronologies are compared to monthly averages of sea surface temperatures (SST), U winds (west to east), V winds (south to north), and Mississippi River discharge.  The gray snapper chronology significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with winds and temperature in March and April while the red snapper chronology correlated with winds in March.  Principal components regression including springtime winds and temperature accounted for 28% and 52% of the variance in the red and gray snapper chronologies, respectively. These results indicate that snapper growth is favored by warm sea surface temperatures and onshore winds from the southeast to the northwest in March and April.  Overall, this study provides preliminary, baseline information regarding the association between climate and growth for these commercially important snapper species.

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Freshwater mussels as indicators of stream flow and temperature

 

Collaborators: Jason Dunham United States Geologocal Survey; Jayne Brim-Box, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation; Brett Blundon, US Forest Service

Funding: USGS, CTUIR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

mussel image largeimage of a western pearlshell freshwater mussel thin section

Although they’re becoming increasingly rare, a variety of freshwater mussel species occur in streams and rivers throughout North America. These organisms can live upward of eighty years, and perhaps even longer in the northern reaches of their range. Our research in the Pacific Northwest shows that these organisms form annual growth increments that can be crossdated to develop chronologies that span multiple decades. Chronologies strongly correlate with instrumental records of stream temperature and flow. Considering that instrumental records of strem environments are uncommon or short in length, mussel chronologies could significantly extend our knowledge of long-term environmental variability in freshwater systems throughout the region.

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Impacts of Swiss needle cast on Douglas-fir forests of the western Oregon Coast Range

 

Collaborators: Dave Shaw and Jeff Stone, Oregon State University
Funding: Swiss Needle Cast Cooperative

SNC samplingSampling an old-growth Douglas-fir

Tree-ring analysis was applied to assess the impacts of the fungal disease Swiss needle cast on the radial growth of mature Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the western Oregon Coast Range.  Although considered endemic to the Pacific Northwest, Swiss needle cast has significantly lowered productivity in Douglas-fir forests only in the past twenty to thirty years.  To date, studies on Swiss needle cast impacts have almost exclusively involved young ( 80 yrs) trees, we extracted tree cores from dominant and codominant Douglas-fir and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) in three even-aged stands in western Oregon.  In the least affected stand growth rates of both species did not significantly differ, while at the most severely diseased site Douglas-fir radial growth was reduced by as much as 85%.  Growth reductions likely associated with Swiss needle cast were dated to as early as 1950, though the most severe impacts occurred after 1984.  An index of Swiss needle cast severity significantly (p 0.01) related to instrumental records of air temperatures such that warm conditions from March through August were associated with reduced radial growth at the most severely affected site.  Overall, this study demonstrates that even mature forests of natural origin are susceptible to severe growth reductions by Swiss needle cast, that warmer spring and summer temperatures are associated with Swiss needle cast impacts, and that thedisease appears to be increasing in severity.

SNC core reducedTree core from a diseased Douglas-fir near Tillamook, OR. Note the partial ring in 1979 followed by a tremendous growth reduction beginning in 1984, indicating the onset of the current Swiss needle cast outbreak.

Selected Publications

PG Coulson, BA Black, and IC Potter. 2013. Sclerochronological studies reveal consistent interannual differences in the otolith growth of two co-occurring species of Platycephalidae and their relationship with water temperature. In press. Marine Biology.

M García-Reyes, WJ Sydeman, BA Black, RR Rykaczewski, SJ Bograd and SA Thompson, and D Schoeman. 2013. Drivers of wind variability in eastern boundary upwelling systems. In press. Geophysical Research Letters.

BA Black., ME Matta, TE Helser, and TK Wilderbuer. 2013. Otolith biochronologies as multidecadal indicators of body size anomalies in yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera). In press. Fisheries Oceanography.

Schroeder, I., B. A. Black, W.J. Sydeman, S. Bograd, E. Hazen, J. Santora, and B. Wels. 2013. The North Pacific High and wintertime pre-conditioning of California Current productivity. Geophysical Research Letters. 40:1-6. doi:10.1002/grl.50100, 2013

García-Reyes, M., W. Sydeman, S.A. Thompson, B.A. Black, R. Rykaczewski, J. Thayer, S. Bograd. 2013. Integrated Assessment of Wind Effects on Central California's Pelagic Ecosystem. Ecosystems. Doi 10.1007/s10021-013-9643-6

Matta, M.E., I.J. Orland, T. Ushikubo, T.E. Helser, B.A. Black, and J.W. Valley. 2013. Otolith oxygen isotopes measured by high-precision secondary ion mass spectrometry reflect life history of a yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera). Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 27:691-699

Black, B.A., V.R. vonBiela, C.E. Zimmerman, and R.J. Brown. 2013. Lake trout otolith chronologies as multidecadal indicators of high-latitude freshwater ecosystems. In press at Arctic.

Helser, T.E., H. Lai, and B.A. Black. 2012 Analyzing the effects of climate variability on marine organism growth: a hierarchical Bayesian approach. Ecological Modelling. 247:210-220. doi 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2012.08.024

B.M. Gillanders, B.A. Black, M.G. Meekan, and M.A. Morrison. 2012. Climate effects on the growth of a temperate reef fish from the Southern Hemisphere: a biochronological approach. Marine Biology. doi 10.1007/s00227-012-1913-x.

B.A. Black, I.D. Schroeder, W.J. Sydeman, S.J. Bograd, B.K. Wells, and F.B. Schwing. 2011. Winter and summer upwelling modes and their biological importance in the California Current Ecosystem. Global Change Biology. doi 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02422.x

B.A. Black, R.J. Allman, I.D. Schroeder, and M.J. Schirripa. 2011. Multidecadal otolith growth histories for red and gray snapper in the northern Gulf of Mexico, USA. Fisheries Oceanography. doi 10.1111/j.1365-2419.2011.00588x

M.E. Matta, B.A. Black, and T.K. Wilderbuer. 2010. Climate-driven synchrony in otolith growth-increment chronologies for three Bering Sea flatfish species. Marine Ecology-Progress Series. 413:137-145.

B.A. Black, J. Dunham, B. Blundon, D. Zima and M. Raggon. 2010. Spatial variability in growth-increment chronologies of long-lived freshwater mussels: implications for climate impacts and reconstructions. Ecoscience 17:240-250.

B.A. Black, I. Schroeder, W. Sydeman, S. Bograd, and P. Lawson. 2010. Wintertime ocean conditions synchronize rockfish growth and seabird reproduction in the central California Current Ecosystem. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 67:1149-1158.

B.A. Black, D.C. Shaw, and J.K. Stone. 2010. Impacts of Swiss needle cast on overstory Douglas-fir of the western Oregon Coast Range. Forest Ecology and Management. 259:1673-1680.

J. Carilli, R. Norris, B.A. Black, and S. Walsh. 2009. Century-scale records of coral growth rates indicate that local stressors reduce coral thermal tolerance threshold. Global Change Biology. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2009.02043.x

B.A. Black, C.A. Copenheaver, D. Frank, M.J. Stuckey, and R.E. Kormanyos. 2009. Multi-proxy reconstructions of northeastern Pacific sea surface temperature data from trees and Pacific geoduck. Palaeoclimatology, Palaeogeography, Palaeoecology. 278:40-47.

B.A. Black. 2009. Climate-driven synchrony across tree, bivalve, and rockfish growth-increment chronologies of the northeast Pacific. Marine Ecology- Progress Series. 378:37-46.

B.A. Black, GW Boehlert, and MM Yoklavich. 2008. Establishing climate-growth relationships for yelloweye rockfish in the northeast Pacific using a dendrochronologial approach. Fisheries Oceanography 5:368-379.

B.A. Black, J.J. Colbert, and N. Pederson. 2008. Relationships between lifespan and radial growth rate within North American tree species. Ecoscience 15:349-357. (Ecoscience feature article)

K.B. Arabas, B.A. Black, J. Speer, B. Amos, L. Lentile, K. Lewis. 2008. Disturbance history of a mixed-conifer stand in north central Idaho, USA. Tree Ring Research 64:67-80.

B.A. Black, C.M. Ruffner, and M.D. Abrams. 2006. Native American influences on the forest composition of the Allegheny Plateau, northwest Pennsylvania. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 36:1266-1275.

B.A. Black, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. 2005. Using tree-ring crossdating techniques to validate annual growth increments in long-lived fishes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 62:2277-2284.

B.A. Black and M.D. Abrams. 2003 Use of boundary-line growth patterns as a basis for dendroecological release criteria. Ecological Applications 13:1733-1749.

B.A. Black and M.D. Abrams. 2001. Influences of Native Americans and surveyor biases on metes and bounds witness-tree distribution. Ecology 82(9):2574-2586.

2011 - Best Paper Award, International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Annual Science Meeting, Sep 2011, Gdansk Poland (out of ~300 contributed talks).

2009 - Member, Scientific Steering Committee for the International Council for the Exploration of the Oceans / North Pacific Marine Science Organization Early Career Scientists Meeting, Mallorca, Spain, April 2012.

2009 - Outstanding Presentation Award in Biological Oceanography. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) Eighteenth Annual Meeting. Oct. 2009, Jeju, Korea.

2009 - Young Scientist Travel Award. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) Eighteenth Annual Meeting. Oct. 2009, Jeju, Korea.

2003 - Member of Gamma Sigma Delta Agriculture Honor Society.

INVITED KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

BA Black. From the trees to the seas: multi-species perspectives on long-term climatic and ecological variability in marine systems. North Pacific Marine Science Organization Annual Meeting, Invited speaker for Workshop 2: "Identifying mechanisms linking physical climate and ecosystem change: Observed indices, hypothesized processes, and data dreams for the future." October 2013. Nanaimo, BC, Canada.

Paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental reconstructions in sclerochronology. Second International Conference on Sclerochronology, July 2010. Mainz, Germany.

Tree rings, otoliths, and the development of annually resolved growth-increment chronologies. The Fourth International Otolith Symposium, August 2009. Monterey, CA.

State of the Science: Sclerochronology. Application of tree-ring techniques in marine and freshwater ecosystems. The First American Dendrochronology Conference, June 2008. Vancouver, BC.

INVITED RESEARCH SEMINARS

BA Black. Of fish, birds, and trees: linkages among diverse ecosystems of western North America. University of Wisconsin Platteville Department of Geography, Oct 2012. Platteville, WI.

Rockfish, trees, and a 500-year history of winter climate in the Central California Current. UCSD Scripps Institute of Oceanography, May 2012. La Jolla, CA.

Rockfish, trees, and a 500-year history of winter climate in the Central California Current. Johann Heinrich von Thunen Institute, May 2012. Hamburg, Germany.

Rockfish, trees, and a 500-year history of winter climate in the Central California Current. NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, January 2012. Santa Cruz, CA.

Growth increments, climate, and the interrelationships among diverse ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest, USA. Iowa State University, January 2011. Ames, Iowa

Growth increments, climate, and the interrelationships among diverse ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest, USA. University of New South Wales, March 2010. Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Growth increments, climate, and the interrelationships among diverse ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest, USA. University of Western Australia, March 2010. Perth, Western Australia.

Growth-increment chronologies reflect ecosystem responses to climate variability in the northeast Pacific. Humboldt State University, December 2009. Arcata, CA.

Otoliths, tree rings, and multidecadal perspectives of environmental variability in marine ecosystems. Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, June 2009. Charleston, OR.

Growth increment analysis as a tool for comparing diverse taxa and ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, April 2008. Panama City, FL.

Growth increment analysis as a tool for comparing diverse taxa and ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, March 2008. Seattle, WA.

Growth increment analysis as a tool for comparing diverse taxa and ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. Oregon State University Department of Fish and Wildlife, January 2007. Corvallis, OR.

Growth increment analysis as a tool for comparing diverse taxa and ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center December 2006. Woods Hole, MA.

Rockfish, tree rings, and climate-driven linkages between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Beijing Normal

Relationships between growth and lifespan in trees: grow fast and die young? USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. May 2006. Corvallis, OR.

Rockfish, tree rings, and climate-driven linkages between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, April 2006. Seattle, WA.

Rockfish, tree rings, and linkages between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Oregon State University Department of Fish and Wildlife, January 2006. Corvallis, OR.

Biochronologies and climate: trees, marine fish and marine-terrestrial linkages. Oregon State University Ecosystem Informatics Colloquium. November 2005. Corvallis, OR.

Biochronologies in the Pacific Northwest: trees, marine fish, and marine-terrestrial linkages. USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. September 2005. Juneau, AK.

Applications of dendrochronology to otoliths of long-live fishes: ageing, chronology development, and relating growth to environment. North American Dendroecology Fieldweek. June 2005. University of Idaho Field Station, McCall, ID.

Biochronologies and climate: trees, marine fishes, and marine-terrestrial linkages. College of Forestry, Oregon State University. September 2004. Corvallis, OR.

Effects of Native American populations on the pre-European settlement forests of the eastern United States. Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. June 2004. Newport, OR.

Application of tree-ring analyses to otolith growth increments: methods for age validation and relating fish growth to ocean variability. Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. April 2004. Newport, OR.

Application of tree-ring analyses to otolith growth increments: methods for age validation and relating fish growth to ocean variability. NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Southwest Fisheries Science Center April 2004. Santa Cruz, CA.

A boundary-line approach to establishing dendroecological release criteria. Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona. May 2003. Tucson, AZ.

Effects of climate and competition on biological growth dynamics: an example from tree-ring analysis. Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. May 2003. Newport, OR.

Influence of Native American populations on the pre-European settlement forests of the Allegheny Plateau. USDA Forest Service, NE Research Station. December 2002. Warren, PA.

Techniques in historical ecology: evaluating human impact on Pennsylvania's forests. Westminster College. March 2000. New Wilmington, PA.

VOLUNTEERED PRESENTATIONS AT PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS

BA Black*, WJ Sydeman, DC Frank, D Griffin, DW Stahle, M Garcia-Reyes, RR Rykaczewski, and SJ Bograd. Five hundred years of variability and extremes in a coupled marine-terrestrial ecosystem. 3rd International Conference on Sclerochronology, May 2013. Carenarfon, Wales, UK. (oral)

VR vonBiela*, CE Zimmerman, GH Kruse, FJ Mueter, BA Black, TE Helser, and DC Douglas. Differential growth responses of Sebastes melanops and Hexagrammos decagrammus to temperature across a latitudinal gradient in the northeast Pacific Ocean. 3rd International Conference on Sclerochronology, May 2013. Carenarfon, Wales, UK. (poster)

Black, B.A.*. Rockfish, trees, and a 500-year history of winter climate in the Central California Current. International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and North Pacific Marine Science Organization Early Career Scientist Meeting, May 2012. Mallorca, Spain (oral).

Black, B.A.*. Rockfish, trees, and a 500-year history of winter climate in the Central California Current. 17th Western Groundfish Conference, February 2012. Seattle, WA (oral)

Black, B.A.*, I.D. Schroeder, W.J. Sydeman, and S.J. Bograd. Multidecadal growth-increment chronologies for North Pacific and North Atlantic rockfish species. International Council for the Exploration of the Sea Annual Science Meeting. September 2011, Gdansk, Poland. (oral)

Wilderbuer, T.*, T. Helser, J. Ianelli, M.E. Matta, and B.A. Black. Use of climate-growth relationships of Bering Sea yellowfin sole to improve stock assessments. American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting, September 2011. Seattle, WA. (oral)

Matta, M.E.*, .B.A Black, T. Helser, AND T. Willderbuer. Climate effects on fish growth: integrating otolith biochronologies and somatic growth of yellowfin sole. American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting, September 2011. Seattle, WA. (oral)

Black, B.A., T.E. Helser, M.E. Matta*, and T.K. Wilderbuer. Impacts of climate on long-term growth patterns of yellowfin sole in the Bering Sea and implications for stock assessment. NOAA Fisheries and the Environment Annual Meeting, August 2011. Seattle, WA. (oral)

Black, B.A., I.D. Schroeder, W.J. Sydeman, S.J. Bograd*, V. Gertseva, and P. Lawson. Beyond the spring transition: winter pre-conditioning in the California Current Ecosystem. NOAA Fisheries and the Environment Annual Meeting, August 2011. Seattle, WA. (oral)

Black, B.A.*, I.D. Schroeder, W.J. Sydeman, S.J. Bograd, B.K. Wells, and F.B. Schwing. Winter and summer upwelling modes and their biological relevance in the California Current Ecosystem. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) 19th Annual Meeting, October 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

vonBiela, V.R.*, C.E. Zimmerman, T.E. Helser, B.A. Black, and D.C. Douglas. Terrestrial and marine correlates to black rockfish growth in the California and Alaska Coastal Currents. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) 19th Annual Meeting, October 2010. Portland, OR (oral)

Thompson, S.A.*, W.J. Sydeman, J.A. Santora, R.M. Suryan, B.A. Black, WT Peterson, and J. Calambokidis. Comparing pathways of functional response of top predators to seasonality of upwelling in the California Current. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) 19th Annual Meeting, October 2010. Portland, OR (poster).

Sydeman, W.J.*, J.A. Santora, S.A. Thompson, K.L. Mills, J.C. Field, B.K. Wells, B. Marinovic, and B.A. Black. Numerical responses of krill predators to variation in krill abundance and spatial organization. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) 19th Annual Meeting, October 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

Black, B.A.*, I. Schroeder, W.J. Sydeman, S.J. Bograd, V. Gertseva, and P. Lawson. Beyond the Spring Transition: Winter Pre-Conditioning of Ecosystem Dynamics and Implications for Sentinel Species and Fisheries. NOAA Fisheries and the Environment Annual Science Meeting, June 2010, Woods Hole, MA. (oral)

Sydeman, W.J., B.A. Black, S.J. Bograd, J. Dorman, J.C. Fields, K.L. Mills, S. Ralston, T.Z. Powell, J.A. Santora, I.D. Schroeder, S.A. Thompson, and F.B. Schwing*. Ocean climate change and phenology: effects on trophic synchrony and consequences to fish and seabirds in the north-central California Current. Climate Change Effects on Fish and Fisheries. April 2010. Sendai, Japan (oral).

Black, B.A. Application of tree-ring techniques across diverse species and ecosystems in western North America. American Geophysical Union Ocean Science Meeting, February 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

Matta, M.E.*, B.A. Black, and T. Wilderbuer. Climate-driven synchrony in otolith growth-increment chronologies for three Bering Sea flatfish species. American Geophysical Union Ocean Science Meeting, February 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

Kastelle, C.R.*, T.E. Helser, B.A. Black, D. Gillespie, J. McArthur, D. Little, K. Charles, S. MacLellan, and C. Hand. Validation of crossdated age estimates with bomb-produced radiocarbon for Pacific geoduck. American Geophysical Union Ocean Science Meeting, February 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

Whitney, E.* and B.A. Black. Growth-increment chronologies of Pacific geoduck reflect climate heterogeneity along the British Columbia coast. American Geophysical Union Ocean Science Meeting, February 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

Schroeder, I.D., W.J. Sydeman, S.J. Bograd, and B.A. Black. Winter pre-conditioning of seabird phenology and rockfish growth in the California Current. American Geophysical Union Ocean Science Meeting, February 2010. Portland, OR (poster)

Carilli, J.*, R.D. Norris, B.A. Black, S.M. Walsh, and M. McField. Local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience to bleaching. American Geophysical Union Ocean Science Meeting, February 2010. Portland, OR (oral).

Black, B.A. Growth-increment chronologies reflect ecosystem responses to climate variability in the northeastern Pacific. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) 18th Annual Meeting, October 2009. Jeju, Korea (oral).

Bograd, S.J.*, .B.A Black, W.J. Sydeman, I. Schroeder, and P. Lawson. Wintertime ocean conditions synchronize rockfish growth and seabird reproduction in the California Current. North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) 18th Annual Meeting, October 2009. Jeju, Korea (oral).

Matta, M.E.* and B.A. Black. Climate-driven synchrony in otolith growth-increment chronologies for three Bering Sea flatfish species. The Fourth International Otolith Symposium, August 2009. Monterey, CA (oral).

Allman, R.*, B.A. Black, and M. Schirripa. Relationships among otolith growth-increment chronologies, climate, and recruitment for red and gray snapper in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Fourth International Otolith Symposium, August 2009. Monterey, CA (oral).

Black, B.A.. Interrelationships among growth, recruitment, and climate in Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Maine rockfish species. Fisheries and the Environment Annual Conference. August, 2008. La Jolla, CA. (oral)

Allman, R.* and B.A. Black. Otolith Chronology Development and Climate-Growth Relationships for Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The First American Dendrochronology Conference, June 2008. Vancouver, BC.

Carilli, J.*, R. Norris, and B.A. Black. Tree-Ring Techniques to Reconstruct the Health and Climate-Growth Relationships of Coral Reefs in MesoAmerica. The First American Dendrochronology Conference, June 2008. Vancouver, BC.

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Spatial and temporal variability in growth of yelloweye rockfish in the northeast Pacific 15th Western Groundfish Conference, February 2008. Santa Cruz, CA. (oral)

Stuckey, M.J.* and B.A. Black. High resolution reconstructions of sea surface temperatures from Pacific geoduck growth increment chronologies. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Aquatic Sciences Meeting. February 2008. Santa Fe, NM. (poster)

Black, B.A. Multidecadal growth chronologies for rockfish in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Fisheries and the Environment Annual Conference. August, 2007. San Jose, CA. (oral).

Black, B.A. Tree-ring techniques in sclerochronology. 1st International Conference on Sclerochronology. July, 2007. St. Petersburg, FL. (oral).

Black, B.A. Rockfish, tree rings, and climate-driven linkages between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Association of American Geographers Annual Conference. April 2007. San Francisco, CA. (oral).

Kormanyos, R.* and B.A. Black. Reconstruction of local sea surface temperatures from Pacific geoduck (Panopea abrupta) growth increments. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Aquatic Sciences Meeting. February, 2007. Orlando, FL. (poster)

Black, B.A. Rockfish, tree rings, and climate-driven linkages between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology. June 2006. Beijing, China. (oral).

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Otoliths, tree rings and climate: long term growth reconstructions and effects of ocean variability on splitnose rockfish 14th Western Groundfish Conference. February 2006. Newport, OR. (oral).

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Growth increment biochronologies as a tool for establishing climate-growth relationships in Pacific rockfish. Climate and Fisheries: Impacts, Uncertainty, and Responses of Ecosystems and Communities. October 2005. Victoria, British Columbia. (oral)

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Tree-ring techniques for Pacific rockfish otoliths: age validation, chronology development, and effects of ocean variability. American Fisheries Society Annual Conference. September 2005. Anchorage, AK. (oral)

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Tree-ring techniques for Pacific rockfish otoliths: age validation, chronology development, and effects of ocean variability. Fisheries and the Environment Annual Meting. June 2005. Seattle, WA. (oral)

Black, B.A.* and M.D. Abrams. Applicability of boundary-line release criteria to North American tree species. Ecological Society of America Annual Conference. August 2004. Portland, OR. (oral)

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Cross-correlating time series of otolith growth increments to validate ages in long-lived fishes. Third International Symposium on Fish and Otolith Research and Application, July 2004. Townsville, Queensland, Australia. (oral)

Black, B.A.*, G.W. Boehlert, and M.M. Yoklavich. Developing time series in otoliths of long-lived fishes; validating ages and showing the relationship to ocean variability. American Geophysical Union, January 2004. Portland, OR. (poster)

Black, B.A.* and M.D. Abrams. A boundary-line approach to establishing release criteria in old-growth hemlock. Ecological Society of America Annual Conference. August 2002. Tucson, AZ. (oral)

Black, B.A.* and M.D. Abrams. Influences of surveyor biases and Native American activities on witness tree distribution in southeastern Pennsylvania Penn State College of Agriculture Research Exhibition. March 2000. University Park, PA. (poster).

Black, B.A.* and M.D. Abrams. Physiographic analysis of witness tree distribution and surveyor bias in the pre-European settlement forests of Lancaster County, PA. Ecological Society of America Annual Conference. August 1998. Baltimore, MD. (poster)

* indicates presenter

COURSES TAUGHT

Undergraduate
UTMSI: MNS 352 Ecosystem Oceanography; Spring 2013
Oregon State University: FS-199, FS-115 Ecology of Oregon Coastal Forests; Jan 2010 and Apr 2011

Graduate
UTMSI: MNS 383 Marine Populations and Fisheries; Fall 2013

STUDENT SUPERVSION
Matthew Dzaugis, MS student, University of Texas at Austin Department of Marine Science. Project "Multi-species indicators of climate impacts on northern Gulf of Mexico fisheries" Expected graduation date: May 2015.

Committee member for:
Kelly Darnell, PhD student, University of Texas at Austin Department of Marine Science. "What factors control seagrass reproductive success in subtropical ecosystems?" Expected graduation date: May 2014.

Jordann Young, MS student, University of Texas at Austin Department of Marine Science. Thesis title to be determined, but project will examine benthic community structure of the Chukchi Sea. Expected graduation date: May 2016.

Vanessa von Biela, PhD student, University of Alaska, Fairbanks. School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. "Environmental correlates to the growth of nearshore fishes in the California and Alaska Coastal Currents" Expected graduation date: May 2015.

Rebecca Kidd, PhD student, Virginia Tech University, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. "Post disturbance assessments of spatial and temporal impacts of climatic, hydrologic, and land use disturbances using biochronologies" Expected graduation date: May 2015.

James Johnston, PhD student, Oregon State University. Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society. "Successional and disturbance dynamics in a dry mixed conifer forest, Blue Mountains, Oregon" Expected graduation date: May 2014.