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Highlights

 
Oil Plus Dispersants May Lead to More Red Tide Events

Oil Plus Dispersants May Lead to More Red Tide Events

Harmful algal blooms, or red tides, can occur naturally, but new research indicates that after an oil spill, the application of dispersant may increase the chance of red tides. A new paper recently released in Environmental Science and Technology provides experimental...

Study Finds Natural Sunlight Affects Oil-Degrading Bacteria Composition and Dynamics

Dr. Hernando Bacosa works at the seawater filtration system aboard the R/V Pelican 2013 cruise to the Deepwater Horizon site in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo provided by Hernando Bacosa.Scientists at The University of Texas Marine Science Institute have demonstrated how...
Seeing Red

Seeing Red

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill spanned 87 days during which approximately 4 million barrels of crude oil were released into the northern Gulf of Mexico; making it the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history. British Petroleum soon after committed $500...
Study Quantifies Photooxidation and Biodegradation of Surface Oil

Study Quantifies Photooxidation and Biodegradation of Surface Oil

Scientists from the University of Texas Marine Science Institute assessed photooxidation and biodegradation rates on different hydrocarbon groups.   They found that photooxidation was the main driver for degrading aromatic hydrocarbons, and biodegradation was the key process controlling the degradation of...