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University Course Schedules


Course Options for First-Year marine science graduate students at UT-Austin

BIO 320   CELL BIOLOGY           FALL
BIO 326R   GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY:MICROBIAL CELL STRUCTURE & GENETICS FALL
BIO 344   MOLECULAR BIOLOGY         SPRING
BIO 370   EVOLUTION           SPRING
BIO 380R   ADVANCED READINGS IN BIOLOGICAL   SCIENCE     FALL
BIO 383K   7-SMNR IN PHYSIOL AND BEHAVIOR       SPRING
BIO 383K   7-SMNR IN PHYSIOL AND BEHAVIOR       FALL
BIO 383K   STUDIES IN ANIMAL SEXUALITY       SPRING
BIO 384C   INTRO TO ECOL/EVOL/BEHAVIOR I       FALL
BIO 384D   INTRO TO ECOL/EVOL/BEHAVIOR II         SPRING
BIO 384K   ADVANCED TOPICS IN MICROBIAL ECOLOGY         FALL
BIO 384K   CONSERVATION BIOLOGY         SPRING
BIO 384K   LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY     FALL
BIO 384K   PHYLOGEN PERSP ECOL/EVOL/BEHAV     FALL
BIO 384L   ISSUES IN POPULATION BIOLOGY       FALL
BIO 386   TOPICS IN CONSERVATION BIOLOGY       FALL
BIO 388M   PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY         FALL
BIO 390C   FUNDAMENTALS OF EVOLUTION             FALL
BIO 390D   FNDMNTLS INTG ANIMAL BEHAV             FALL
BIO 393   BIOFUELS             SPRING
BIO 395M   ADVANCED MICROBIOLOGY         SPRING
C E 394K   3-GEOG INFO SYS IN WATER RES       FALL
CH 369   FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOCHEMISTRY       SPRING
CH 391L   BIOINFORMATICS           SPRING
CRP 383   ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND LAW       SPRING
EER 396   ENERGY LAW           FALL
GEO 381G   GEOMICROBIOLOGY         FALL
GEO 382S   PHYSICAL HYDROLOGY         FALL
GEO 391   PALEOCLIMATOLOGY         FALL
GEO 391   FUNDAMENTALS/APPLIC OF ICP-MS       FALL
GEO 388H   ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPE GEOCHEM       SPRING
GEO 388L   ISOTOPE GEOLOGY           FALL
GRG 396T   SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING       SPRING
MOL 395J   GENES/GENOMES/GENE EXPRESSN           FALL
M E 397   LASERS AND OPTICS           SPRING
PHR 384K   FUNDAMENTALS OF TOXICOLOGY       FALL
PHR 390N   BIOCHEM AND MOLEC TOXICOLOGY       SPRING
PSY 384K   ADV STATS: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN       SPRING
PSY 394T   REGRESSION ANALYSIS         FALL
SDS 380C   STATISTICAL METHODS  I                               FALL
SDS 383C   STATISTICAL MODELING I             FALL
SDS 384   4-REGRESSION ANALYSIS             FALL

CORE COURSES

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MNS 481C. Marine Ecosystem Dynamics (Buskey/Dunton)
Taught Every Fall

Interactions between organisms and the physical processes that regulate productivity and distribution of marine life in oceanic and coastal ecosystems. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and either consent of instructor or the following: six semester hours of coursework in biological sciences chosen from Biology 311C, 311D, and the equivalent; and Chemistry 301 and 302, or the equivalent.

MNS 482C. Marine Biogeochemistry (Liu/Lu)
Taught Every Fall

Study of chemical, biological, geological, and physical processes that influence cycling of bioactive elements in marine waters and sediments. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and either consent of instructor or the following: Physical Science 303 and 304, or the equivalent; Chemistry 301, 302, 310M (or 610A), and 310N (or 610B), or the equivalent; and six semester hours of coursework in biological sciences chosen from Biology 311C, 311D, and the equivalent.

MNS 483C. Adaptations to the Marine Environment (Fuiman/Thomas)
Taught Every Spring

The physiological basis for organismal and population-level responses to marine environments. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and either consent of instructor or the following: six semester hours of coursework in biological sciences chosen from Biology 311C, 311D, and the equivalent; and Chemistry 301 and 302, or the equivalent.

MNS 191. Seminar in Marine Science: Scientific Communication - Brett Baker
Taught Every Spring

Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas – Taught virtually.
Recent advances in the marine sciences, discussed by students, faculty and staff members, and guest lecturers. Topics to be announced. Must be taken twice to fulfil degree requirements.

ADVANCED COURSES

(All advanced courses are taught on an alternating year schedule)

*The Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Marine Science will periodically add or delete advanced courses from this list depending upon program needs and faculty workloads. Students are required to enroll in a minimum of six hours of MNS advanced courses and encouraged to communicate with their thesis advisor in the selection of advanced courses. Course Title and Description are updated the semester prior to their listing for fall or spring semester.

Fall Semester (Odd Years)

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Genomics in Ocean Sciences - Brett Baker

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Marine Populations and Fisheries - Lee Fuiman

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Wetland Landscape Ecology/Remote Sensing - Jessica O'Connell

 

Spring Semester (Even Years)

MNS 193. Marine Science and Policy or Biological Oceanography – Tracy Villareal

MNS 293. Principles of Marine Science: Marine and Organic Geochemistry - Zhanfei Liu

MNS 382. Estuarine Ecology - Ken Dunton

MNS 393. Topics in Marine Science, Topic 11: Coastal Watersheds - Jim McClelland et al.

 

Fall Semester (Even Years)

MNS 193. Scientific Writing Workshop - Deana Erdner

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Reproductive Physiology of Fish - Peter Thomas

 

Spring Semester (Odd Years)

MNS 193. Topic 10 Principles of Marine Science: Zooplankton Ecology - Ed Buskey

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Environmental Physiology of Fishes - Andrew Esbaugh

MNS 193. Topic 7 Principles of Marine Science: Marine Botany - Ken Dunton

MNS 382 Phytoplankton Diversity – Deana Erdner

MNS 382 Principles of Marine Botany – Ken Dunton

 

FALL 2020: 

MNS 193. Scientific Writing Workshop - Deana Erdner
This course will focus on writing tasks related to the conduct of science, from the basics of writing through more advanced aspects as the semester progresses. Students will be expected to write each week, and provide feedback on others' writing. 

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Reproductive Physiology of Fish - Peter Thomas
Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas – not video-linked Environmental and endocrine control of reproduction in teleost fishes including the role of hypothalamus/pituitary/gonadal axis, neuroendocrine pathways, genomic and nongenomic steroid actions, ovarian cycle, and gamete physiology.

 

SPRING 2021

MNS 193. Topic 10 Principles of Marine Science: Zooplankton Ecology - Ed Buskey
Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas – Taught face-to-face.
Why study marine zooplankton? True, they are small, weak swimmers, and difficult to see without a microscope, but they are an essential component in marine food webs and include larval forms for most marine invertebrates. Class topics may include: collecting and sampling zooplankton, physiology, feeding ecology, population biology, reproduction, behavior and sensory perception.

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Environmental Physiology of Fishes - Andrew Esbaugh
Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas - Taught face-to-face.
Fishes are the most diverse vertebrate group on the planet and live in a variety of different environments. Furthermore, many fish species can transition between very different environments. This class will explore the mechanistic physiology associated with survival in different aquatic habitats and the role of physiology in understanding the impacts of environmental degradation on fish survival and performance. Specific subjects may include the thermodynamics of water and ion balance, pH balance and respiratory physiology as well as phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental change.

MNS 193. Topic 7 Principles of Marine Science: Marine Botany - Ken Dunton
Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas – taught face-to-face.
Marine Botany will introduce students to the marine vegetation of the major coastal biomes of the world, including but not limited to seagrasses, marshes, mangroves, and seaweeds. The purpose of this class is to provide graduate level inquiry-based exploration on topics including ecology, diversity, natural history, reproduction, photosynthetic strategies, and biotic responses to a warming climate.  Field trips will broaden students understanding of the ecology of these systems with respect to habitat, biotic interactions, community structure, and biotic linkages to consumers. The course format consists of seven meetings that include a background lecture followed by field trips to specific vegetation assemblages. Each student is expected to lead one discussion based on assigned readings from the primary literature and write a final paper on a selected topic. The course uses a thematic approach and is divided into two major parts: a section that concentrates on plant photophysiology and ecology and a section on vegetation assemblages. Students will gain a wonderful appreciation and understanding of the diversity of marine plants and their unique strategies of growth, photosynthesis and reproduction from readings, class discussions, guest lectures, and field trips.

Phytoplankton Diversity - MNS 382
Taught by Dr. Deana Erdner
T 9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. lecture in Port Aransas ERC seminar room
T 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. lab in Port Aransas
Face-to-Face

This course will cover the taxonomy of the major phytoplankton groups, their physiology, and their role in marine ecosystems. Through a combination of field sampling, lectures, and practical laboratory exercises, you will investigate the composition and distribution of planktonic algae and how they respond to environmental change. You will be introduced to sampling regimes, identification techniques, counting methods, and a variety of modern analytical tools (flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, PAM fluorometry, microsens O2 sensor) used to study phytoplankton physiology. Major course topics include (broadly based):

  • Evolution of major phytoplankton lineages, including endosymbiotic theory and endosymbiotic event(s)
  • Identification of phytoplankton, including differences in cellular structure and physiology among phytoplankton groups
  • Growth of phytoplankton, including photosynthesis, light responses, nutrient requirements
  • Composition of phytoplankton communities: how they change and how they affect ecosystem function
  • Global patterns of phytoplankton distribution, diversity, and function
  • Role of phytoplankton in food webs
  • Topical issues in phytoplankton ecology, such as harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, ocean acidification, climate change, polar systems
  • Graduate students are expected to participate in one hour discussions section each week and perform additional/graduate level work as prescribed in the syllabus

 

FALL 2021: (Topics NOT FINALIZED):

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Genomics in Ocean Sciences - Brett Baker
Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas - not video-linked
This course will focus on how recent innovations in omic sequencing (DNA and RNA) have revolutionized our understanding of the biogeochemistry and ecology of marine life. It will involve reading and discussing a breadth of publications on topic; including methods, reviews, and environmentally focused studies.

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Marine Populations and Fisheries - Lee Fuiman
Held at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas - not video-linked
Many marine scientists are charged with the task of applying the principles of population biology toward management of exploited populations of marine organisms in an effort to balance the needs for harvest (commercial or recreational) against sustainability. In this course, students will read and discuss important publications dealing with the principles of marine population biology, including topics such as age and growth, mortality, recruitment stock identification, connectivity, and the contributions of early life stages to population biology.

MNS 193. Principles of Marine Science: Wetland Landscape Ecology/Remote Sensing - Jessica O'Connell